Case Studies

Ewe percussion (Ghana)

Ewe percussion (Ghana)

Ghanian Ewe percussion is a form of traditional dance-drumming which continues to be one of the most thriving music forms in West Africa. It is connected with traditional religious events, seasonal festivals, funerals, and daily life. The majority of Ewe groups remain unknown outside their communities, despite extensive ethnomusicological research focusing on the work of a few musical families.

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Vietnamese ca tru

Vietnamese ca tru

Ca trù is a vocal chamber music genre with a long history in northern Vietnam. Due to war and political tension ca trù was rarely performed from the 1950s to the late 1980s, and much musical knowledge was lost. Since the early 1990s a revival has taken place, and although the number of skilled musicians is still low, the amount of people engaged with ca trù has grown significantly in the last decade or so, especially through the phenomenon of the ca trù ‘club’.

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Australian Aboriginal yawulyu/awelye

Australian Aboriginal yawulyu/awelye

This report concerns yawulyu/awelye, an important ceremonial genre of traditional songs performed by women in Central Australia. Our fieldwork in the area over many years, and a series of interviews we conducted as part of the Sustainable Futures Project, we discuss various issues and ideas concerning the sustainability of the tradition.

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Explore solutions

Identify key challenges to the sustainability of the music genre you are involved with by answering the questions in this section, and explore ideas about how to address them.

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Looking at the Stats

98% of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music traditions have already been lost

Source: Australia/New Zealand Regional Committee of the ICTM – Statement on Indigenous Australian Music and Dance, 2011

According to Austria’s national statistical agency, opera attendance grew by 3.8 percent between 2011 and 2012.
Source: http://www.newsweek.com/2014/07/25/if-you-want-sing-opera-learn-german-259368.html

for a musician in Senegal

This is about 15 per cent lower than the country’s GDP per capita. Estimates by the Africa Music Project.
Source: http://www.uis.unesco.org/Library/Documents/creative-economy-report-culture-2013.pdf

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